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dc.contributor.authorDaniel, John
dc.contributor.authorUvalic-Trumbic, Stamenka
dc.coverage.spatialGlobalen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-11T11:09:56Z
dc.date.available2016-12-11T11:09:56Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/2610
dc.description.abstractOnline technology already permeates higher education - whether programmes are formally offered online or not. We adopt the definitions of the Babson surveys in distinguishing between face-to-face, blended, and online learning. We ask first whether the current fashion for blended learning is a rearguard action against the trend to move much of higher education towards fully online learning, or whether blended learning has special merits. If so, what are those merits? // Flexible learning is a term also used to describe various combinations of classroom and online teaching. Is flexibility a purely positive phenomenon or does it have limits? If so, what are those limits? // Finally, we hear that higher education is being unbundled. How far can it be unbundled without falling apart and losing the respect of the public on whom it depends? // Paper ID 410en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCommonwealth of Learning (COL) and Open University Malaysia (OUM)en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectFlexible Learningen_US
dc.subjectHybrid/Blended Learningen_US
dc.subjectHigher Educationen_US
dc.titleBlended Learning - What Mix? Flexible Learning - How Supple?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US


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