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dc.contributor.authorMurphy, David
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-10T06:32:57Z
dc.date.available2014-12-10T06:32:57Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/64
dc.description.abstractHaving been asked to write about how to design and develop distance education courses, I have to start by stating "it all depends". Though it sounds like a bit of a cop out, it's true. Context is paramount. Having worked in different countries and for various organisations as both a writer and an instructional designer, mostly as the latter, I know that every job has unique challenges and variables. Course design and development is a people-oriented activity that calls for creativity and innovation; it cannot be fully captured by a neat prescriptive model, just as there can never be a single model of human learning. // Before getting into detail, I'd better clarify that I perceive instructional design as the art and science of crafting effective learning environments. That is, it calls for the application of scientific and artistic skills in the creation of effective learning conditions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCommonwealth of Learning, Vancouveren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKnowledge Series
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0en_US
dc.subjectDistance Educationen_US
dc.subjectInstructional Designen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Learning Materials (SLMs)en_US
dc.titleInstructional Design for Self-Learning for Distance Educationen_US
dc.typeBookleten_US


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